Irish Granny = Irish Passport

Did you know that even if you yourself weren’t blessed to be born on the island of Ireland, you might still be eligible to apply for an Irish passport.  If either your parents or your grandparents were born in Ireland, you can apply for Irish Citizenship and an Irish Passport.

One of my more recent projects was to find an Irish birth record for a grandparent of a gentleman born in the UK and now living in Ireland.  He knew his parents were both born in the UK and had their birth certs.  While there was no documentation to prove it, he had heard that one of his grannies was from Ticknock, which he thought might be in Wicklow.

Using the information contained in his father’s Scottish birth certificate, I was able to locate  his Granny and Grandpa’s marriage in Dundee, Scotland in 1904.  This gave me the names, ages, addresses and occupations of both the bride and groom as well as the names of their parents and witnesses.  Scottish records provide lots of detailed information and this one was no exception.  I was then able to find the groom’s birth in Dundee, making him a Scottish Grandpa –  not what we were looking for.   The bride’s surname  was Kelly and there was no trace of her birth in Scotland. In order to search of the Irish Civil records I turned to tHhe fabulous website www.irishgenealogy.ie where I found hundreds of Kelly’s born around 1880. Knowing that Ticknock is located in south county Dublin,  helped to narrow the search and lead me to the  birth record I was looking for and proving that Yes – Granny was Irish!

Armed with this information I then ordered all the relevant birth, marriage and death certificates required to proceed with the Irish Passport application.  So it seems our Irish Grandparents are still looking out for us, even decades after their deaths.

Have a look at a sample of a Scottish Civil Record. Here is a copy of a death record for one of my own ancestors, Walter Paterson.  It gives so much information, showing Walter’s parents names, including his mother’s maiden name, his son, both his wives as well as his own age, profession, address and cause of death.

Walter Paterson death register 1883


The following is an extract from the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs web site.   https://www.dfa.ie/passports-citizenship/citizenship/born-abroad/

Born outside Ireland?

You are automatically an Irish citizen if one of your parents was an Irish citizen who was born in Ireland.

You can become an Irish citizen if one of your grandparents was born in Ireland, or you can become an Irish citizen if one of your parents was an Irish citizen at the time of your birth, but was not born in Ireland. If you’re eligible, you can register your birth on the Foreign Births Register.

With the United Kingdom about to depart from the European Union, many UK citizens are on the search for their Irish granny or grandpa in order to apply for their Irish Passport.


 

My origins using DNA testing

Probably one of the main questions which leads to every family tree search is ‘Where do I come from?’   Growing up as I child I simply knew that my mum was from Cork and my dad from Dublin.  I then learnt that My mum’s mother was Welsh are her fathers parents were Scottish and Irish.  On my dad’s side, his mother was Scottish (though born in the North of England) and his father’s family had come from Northern Ireland.  So what did that make me?  Born in Cork, I suppose I’ll always be first and foremost a Cork woman.  My Birth-Cert and passport say I’m Irish.  I look Irish (in a conventional sort of way).  I sound Irish.  I feel Irish.  That begs another question – What is Irish?   Going back just two generations my ancestors were certainly not from this island of Ireland.  Of my 8 great-grandparents, 3 were Scottish (Stewart, Paterson, Barclay), 2 were Welsh (Davies, Jones), 1 from Northern Ireland (McCully) and 2 from what is today called Ireland (McConnell, Wood).

Not being of a scientific mind-set and therefore not really understanding DNA I was slow and sceptical to have my DNA tested.  Eventually however, curiosity got the better of me and I just had to give it a go.  The first test I had done was for my adult son as this would show up both my own and my husband’s DNA and possibly link me to more relatives.  As I keep my tree on http://www.ancestry.co.uk, I decided to use their autosomal testing service.  It really couldn’t have been any easier and in just a few short weeks, his results came back.  Even though I sent it off with just a number for a reference and not linked to my tree it came back showing that the closest relative on their database was a cousin of my father-in-law.  This gave me confidence in the system .  I was surprised how much of his DNA originated outside of the British Isles.

andys-ethnicity-results

Now curiosity really got the better of me as I didn’t know which part of his DNA was mine and which was his father’s.  The only answer was to get my own test done.  The results have just come back and surprisingly the two results are quite similar.  Even more reassuring is that Andrew is definitely my son!!  I’m not sure how I’d have reacted if that hadn’t been the case.  Unfortunately there are no close family links connected with my test on the ancestry database yet.

eunices-ethnicity-results

Having traced much of my family back to the 1700’s on many of my branches I haven’t found any proof of them stemming from mainland Europe or beyond.  It’s quite unlikely that I ever will.  But it’s nice to know the migration pattern of my ancestors.  I hope that as more people get tested that I may get links to others who share a common ancestry.

As for the question of where am I from? –  I’m still a Cork woman.  I’m still Irish and now I can say with confidence that I’m European.